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of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated all those people and not done justice to their memories or their suffering if he came out with a one-sided apology. what he did do was in clear, unequivocal terms acknowledging the crimes of the past. >> it is about as gloomy as a prediction that could have been made about syria. >> we do not see any prospect of any end of violence or political dialogue to start. >> he also said he is worried about atrocities being committed by both sides then theya uninvestigation has found rebel fighters. the secretary expressed support. this video is said to show rebels detaining fighters in a refugee camp. these pictures ar
today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out
three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he will run and it comes after sylvia berlusconi declared over the weekend he would throw his hat in the ring for the job of premier. carolyn ross is in italy following the details there. can you walk us through the time frame here? when are we expected monte to step down? what happens next? >> good morning to you, kelly. here is the time frame for you. over the next few weeks, we're expecting the budget sta
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critic
us today. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the world on edge and the u.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments bas
us for more is alan capp, head of credit straebtegyt lloyds. alan, let's get your reaction. the number is going in the right direction. does it make much of a difference? >> right now the equity markets have had a great run. they're looking a bit overstretched. so i'm strul link to see how financial markets will respond positively to this. i think we need something bell to repel us forward. >> what do these numbers translate into in your forecast? >> what these are suggesting to us is manufacturing will not be able to support any growth in the eurozone, so it suggests that the downturn in gdp is likely to continue into fourth quarter, remain in recession and that's obviously a struggle on global growth, as well. >> and we stay in recession in the first quarter? we're now in december. >> there are some signs particularly the china pmi numbers and what we've seen from gdp recently that maybe some of the markets key to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but agai
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
-- >> in the u.s., president obama makes a last ditch attempt to find a budget compromise. >> in the angry and protests in the streets of regain rate. doctors warn the victim's condition is getting worse. >> and running the sydney yacht race for a sixth time. >> within the next hour, president barack obama is set to meet with top republicans to discuss the nation's looming fiscal clit. white house aides have indicated that obama will discuss measures for avoiding the rest of the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that will bite if lawmakers fail to come up with a plan. >> pessimism remains the prevailing mood in washington as the january deadline rapidly approaches. neither democrats nor republicans have any new proposals for a workable compromise. >> the starbucks coffee chain has urged its workers in washington, d.c., area to write "come together" on the cups, a plea for party leaders to work out a compromise, but some customers say that is not enough. >> i mean, i like with starbucks is riding on the cups. i wish they would write, like, something else, like "republicans, stop being s
seaport complex at a near standstill for the eighth straight day. drake christopher is going to join us with how this could impact your holiday season. lori: i was just kidding, actually. bacon is kosher. i do not eat kosher. melissa: speaking of kosher -- lori: rubbing elbows with the royals. our next ambassador -- you are speechless. melissa: i do not know about that one. time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides is standing by. nicole: right now, we are seeing the dow jones industrial average down just 12 points. so far, we are having a losing week on wall street. let's see what happens at the end of the day. these moves are really fractional. the s&p down a third of a percent. december, traditionally, is the best month for the s&p 500 since 1950. we will see whether or not that seems to come to correlation. i want to take a look at some of the auto retailers. it turns out they are not doing so well with their sales. pat boys, in particular, revenue missing for the third time in a row. both companies not seeing sales. warmer weather plays a role. back to you. m
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
>>> the formalitier government is accused of being sent rick. >> massive write-downs n u.s. and brazil while warning over a week's global recovery. >>> and hsbc agreed to settle money laundering charges, paying a record $1.9 billion fine. >>> and we're getting the bumping out here today, not only because it's christmas, but -- >> because james ferguson is here. >> and we are finally in the same place at the same time. ♪ reunited and it feels so good ♪ >> there we go. >> my apologies to everyone for that. >> how about that voice? i feel a christmas sing along coming on at some point. >> it's the holt day spirit. >> it is. >> also, we are outside the u.s. senate. we're going to see just how much progress has been made or how little progress between the president and congress on the fiscal cliff situation. >>> and we'll find out just how much the european debt crisis has affected tourist's willingness to travel to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into wher
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank of japan to heed the call of the masses. abe is beating the heat on the boj just one day after his party's huge win and two days after the bank's next rate setting meeting. kaori enjoji has the latest for us. how much of a game changer is all this? >> this is a serious game changer. it's a comeback for the dlp and shinzo abe. he has made it clear that the economy and economic recovery is going to
in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss reg
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
-bowles. erskin bowles will join us this morning, as well. if you have the democrats quoting him, the republicans quoting him, we'll very where he comes down and where things stand right now. >> you do simpson-bowles now instead of the bowls-simpson? >> i looked it up on going.. the more often cited is simple is son-bowles. >> the journal has an interesting piece. they don't like corker for breaking rank. they say why are republicans negotiating this themselves? they say let boehner do the negotiations. anyway, you would be hard pressed to find something who sdn have aen opinion on the fiscal cliff. this weekend, the ahead of the imf said the united states is more vulnerable to its domestic trouble more than anything else happening in the eurozone. christine lagarde says a balanced approach is needed and she says don't kick the can down the road, which is rich coming from a european. >>> european trading the lower this morning. italy's prime minister mario monti, yes, the same one that is famous from all the anti-trust things back in the -- was that the '90s? >> the '90s, yeah. >> monti announcin
. people's lives and jobs and retirement funds. >> thank you for being with us this morning. dave, you are headed to washington. let us know what's happening. >> he's going to fix it. >> we're going to have pizza. >> make sure you join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" is next. ♪ >>> led zeppelin to wash away monday blues. congrats to the band for winning kennedy center honors last night. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla along with jim cramer, david faber live at nyse. melissa will join us in the next hour. we're kicking off the month of december with strength. anticipating good auto numbers today. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing da
statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the newspapers, you feel like what else can he say? it's not going to be a day where you'll buy sterling aggressively because most of the news is going to be bad. we're going to have lower growth. potentially
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
tony blair is with us. but planes from iran. revolutionary guards showing off what they are claiming to be is a captured american drone. coming up why the pentagon says don't believe it. >>> and baby makes three at buckingham palace. the royal couple, will and kate, creating a media frenzy on both sides of the pond with word that they are expecting. we're going to go live to london. >> talk about this morning, in addition to tony blair, we're talking to democratic congressman xavier becerra, republican senator ron johnson from the state of wisconsin, also pat houston, whitney houston's sister-in-law and manager and jeopardy champion ken jennings written a new book. it's tuesday, december 4th, "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome everybody, you're watching "starting point." we're honored this morning to have the former british prime minister tony blair with us as our guest. he's going to be weighing in as a number of topics. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk a
. >> about 10.5. >> join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good wednesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. what a morning shaping up here. a little data to look at. m&a. the president speaks to the business roundtable in a couple of hours. futures with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with th
to facebook, like us and ask your question. >> talk of the day, sirius, the company announcing a $2 billion share buy back. and it's a $2 stock, but everybody knows it. mel's gone, howard's still there. >> all right, that does it for us today, again join me on facebook after the show for office hours. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street," i'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >>
massachusetts. mr. markey: and if barney frank was down here, none of us would have -- none of this would have happened in terms of the understanding of the parliamentary procedure. he was up there trying to grab an managenary microphone. . john oliver has been for us -- olver, has been for us an invaluable colleague. he taught so much to us. when he sat down with us talking about transportation, he explained our own districts to us as far as what was possible. on climate change, i talked to him for about 20 years. he was on this issue in the early 1990's and probably understood it probably even before that. he is that smart. he is that visionary in terms of the issues are essential not just to massachusetts, but to our planet. and it has been migrate honor to have served with you, john and to have called you my friend and colleague overall of these years and we thank you so much for what you have done for us and for the country and thank you. and with that -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from
the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about 1%. blame politicians in the u.s. and blame heavyweight samsung. this accounts for some 20% of market value on the kospi index. down 4%. that hurt the broader markets. this is, of course, because eu regulators are p
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
for us? >> well, on the fiscal cliff, i wish it were different, but it certainly is beginning to shape up like, in the end, the democrats will be able to step back and say we raised taxes on rich people and the republicans will take credit for cutting programs. and it looks like it will go into january, unfortunately. the market doesn't seem to care. >> all the big deal, boehner and obama tried to do last year, still have to do that, simpson boles-type thing. >> by what the secretary of the treasury said yesterday. >> right. >> thank you for being here. >> bromance. a lot of fun. make sure you join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street" live from the new york stock exchange, i'm carl kin ten nia with melissa lee, cramer and neighborer are off today but we are joined by dennis. good morning to you dennis, thanks for coming in. futures today, a lot to deal with as you probably know. the fiscal cliff headline watch continues. you just heard john kanas say the market not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent dat
and be willing to negotiate on spending. >> i see the future. the president lets us go over and then proposes a tax cut for the lower 98%. >> could you vote against it? >> he could do that for the two -- the two top rates is $400 billion. but he's got to do something on spending to address the problem. >> thank you, senator, for your time. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." we're here at the new york stock exchange. let's get a check on how we're setting up for the first trading session of the week. we certainly have a lot to chew on over the weekend with the sunday talk shows, focusing on the fiscal cliff. it looks like we're looking at a lower open for the dow. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's on
on specific spending cuts. joining us now for analysis, tony fratto, of hamilton place strategies and former white house press secretary and gerald bernstein former economic adviser to vice president joe biden. gentlemen, thank you for being here with us and getting this special day of coverage kicked off for us. >> rising early and rising above. >> exactly. let's talk about this. jared, it seems like things have gotten quieter. do you think that's the case? is that a good sign? >> i think it's probably a pretty good sign. if you look at this morning's papers, you see a number of articles suggesting that there's a bit more compromise in the air. my concern is that tomorrow's papers may say the opposite. so interestingly, there's been some pretty leak free discussions going on, which i actually think is a good thing. they're obviously big, outstanding questions. you mentioned the tax rate issue. one question i keep coming up against is the president and john boehner are now supposedly having good, substantive discussions. can boehner bring the troops along? if he agrees with the president, ca
's just 17. he knew he had to save the woman or die trying. when we met him later he tells us we had a feeling that she was still alive. we wanted to save her, to get her to a hospital. as he crawls closer, he can see her hand, her fingers shaking. cover him, cover him someone shouts. other fighters lay down cover fire. abdullah quickly ties the hose to her legs but unable to retreat. i said to myself, if i die, it's god's will that i die next to this woman he tells us. finally he makes a run for it. the rebels drag the woman back. >> the woman and her son were walking right down the street. the rebel fighters shouted at them to stay away, but too late. aleppo is crisscrossed with similar sniper alleys. some are known, but others do not reveal themselves until the first shot has been fired. despite abdullah's efforts, the woman dies. her son utterly distraught. don't die now, don't die today he pleads. answer me, mom. answer me. she's not dead. she's not dead he says as he collapses. abdullah is left wondering whether her life could have been saved if he'd reached her sooner. until r
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
workers areot using up all of the vacation time they are said to be seen as lazy and losing their job. is is a good sign for the economy. how so, steve. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we raise taxes we'll have longer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and ople here i the united states and government union. and i was on vacatn and check my blackberry and read a ri unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never onacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say ecomy you are talking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productivity. a 2010 study show that americans felt refre
, a u.s. investigation finds more evidence about how walmart used payoffs allegedly in mexico to advance its gold down there. it's tuesday, december 18th, 2012. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. our guest host this hour is julia sed. fiscal cliff negotiations, our top story. now president obama is proposing leaving lower tax rates in place for everyone except those earning $400,000 and above. that's above the $250,000 threshold that the president has been demanding for months, but it is still far from speaker john boehner's request of $1 million. a source familiar with the talk says this is by no means the final offer for the white house. the move by the president was welcomed, albeit with some reservations. we will talk about the latest developments in just a few minutes. in the meantime, the global markets seem to be taking note of the optimism. you can see right now that those dow futures are up by 54 points. this comes after a decent rally for the markets yeste
. we have two guest hosts with us. welcome to both of you you. we have a lot of things to talk about. the white house says that a republican counteroffer does not meet the test of balance. the latest republican offer would overhaul the tax code and raise $800 billion in new revenue, it would also seek $600 billion in health savings and $200 billion for revising the cost of living increases for social security. the net savings would add up to $2.2 trillion over ten years. now, again, this is the republican counterproposal to the plan that the white house has already put out. speaker john boehner has said that this is something that is much closer to the bowles-simpson proposal. erskine bowles saying the gop offer does not represent the plan, he says both sides are kind of far away from it at this point and that it's now up to negotiators to figure out where the middle ground is today. >> bowles said that the mid point that i used back in -- this is where we were last year. so used the mid point of the negotiations, but it's in longer the mid point i guess. >> he also said -- he is a t
. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> w
, but opponents say they intend to continue their protests. >> turning out to the u.s., president barack obama has just announced his nomination of senator john kerry to become secretary of state. >> john kerry is currently chairman of the senate foreign relations committee and has undertaken numerous diplomatic missions. he also ran unsuccessfully for president back in 2004. the move has been widely expected. observers say he should win easy confirmation in the senate. staying in washington, and president obama is increasing the pressure on the country's powerful gun lobby's and calling for stricter regulations on assault weapons. he has also challenged his fellow gun control advocates to take a clear stand on the issue. >> america had a moment of silence for the victims of the newtown massacre. exactly one week ago, a young man armed with a semiautomatic rifle gunned down 20 people in connecticut. meanwhile, the national rifle association has taken a hard- nce on the issue, calling for armed security guards in yev american school to protect students. >> the gun owner's organizatitin has proposed
shut at 1:30 in the afternoon and open again at 5:00 p.m. carlows also uses that break for a nap, for now at least. -- carlos. >> i think soon we will have to stay open after lunch. this is a tourist area. we have to stay open because it is customer friendly even though a lot of people are against it. but business is business. >> to make sure tourists in particular are not faced with shuttered doors, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you re
we have been talking with retiring congressional members. join us later tonight for a sixth-down we recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another
kernen. andrew ross sorkin is off. we have two well-known market voices joining us. barry knapp and richard bernstein. we have a lot to talk about. thanks for coming in. we'll start things off in just a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what the
with. all right. >> we want to thank john harwood for joining us for the hour. we also want to thank tony and jared for being with us through this whole hour. >> and sitting through that. >> happy new year to everybody. and we should point out, look, fiscal cliff, market says, what, me worry at this point? >> i wonder what really did happen. did you get anything -- >> i think it was tony and i. >> not since we last talked. >> you guys get along well. as long as you're a steeler fan, you get along. it was great. thanks, guys. we've got to go. >> can you see this? we're giving out the fiscal cliff bars today. >> bye, everybody. happy new year, joe. right now, time for "squawk on the street." ♪ >> one final trading session for 2012. and it comes, of course, with the add eed drama of a fiscal cliff set to take place 15 hours from now. i'm carl, with melissa lee. cramer and faber are off today. good morning to you, dan. >> good morning. >> the house gaveling into session just a few moments ago. business there is going to start at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. futures are showing some resilie
the rest from there. the lady goes on to say it's a quid pro quo give us the monny because we voted for you. the question, will the president offer any hint of a bailout, bailout help for deeroit today. will he address union anger at michigan's right to work legislation? this goes to the heart of government spending and the position of organized labor in president obama's second term. we're right there in michigan. let's go to facebook. weigh in on what's happening there. will detroit get a bailout and what do you think about the unions? will they win? good questions all. now, one of the worst blowouts in nfl history. seattle seahawks beat arizona cardinals 58-0. the cardinals threw four interceptions fumbled four times and gained 154 yards and seattle undefeated at home and then there's this. the new york giants scored only 52 points in the win over the new orleans saints. the star was the rookie and he returned the kick off for touchdown and all purpose yards and kept the giants in the lead. and major result for the economy. people having fewer babies, blaming the economy and one woman wh
. we have more on the life of the singer jenni rivera. what can you tell us? >> good morning. she sold 50 million records, won two billboard music awards and was a star of her reality show and served as a judge on a popular talent show in mexico. hard-working until the end. she performed the last concert saturday night in monterey, mexico, hours before dying in a plane crash on her way to yet another commitment. [ speaking spanish ] they call her diva. and for anyone who ever saw her on stage, it was easy to see why. she sang heartwrenching song that's spoke to the common woman, especially mexican-americans. >> translator: every song, every lyric i'm thinking of them and how i can relate to them. >> reporter: jenni rivera was born in long beach, california to mexican parents, their story of humble origins. with an interview in cnn, she spoke about how she sold records at a los angeles flea market and how the family expected cans for the meager income they could bring in selling the metal. >> translator: it is very flattering when they tell me i'm a great artist, a great entertainer. bu
. make sure to join us tomorrow. that's it for us. "squawk on the street" is next. >>> all right. with that, good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. we'll continue to monitor what jamie dimon does at the deal mark conference. we await the federal reserve statement, and news conference in just a few hours. as for europe, some green arrows, despite a miss in the eurozone in production this morning. >> the road map starts this morning with, of course, the fed. expectations for revamped bond buying program. what will the economic forecast say about next year and what to make of the "wall street journal" story that says academics are driving monetary policy at secret dinners in switzer land. >> more counteroffers in the debt negotiations. it looks like corporate taxes are part of the deductions. >> costco beats by 2 cents, better sales and better sales and membership fees. >> some more reports about apple tv today. the journal said it's designing a high -- new high-resolution set. microsoft trying to widen the list of retailers that will carry the surface ta
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